Dog Cookies Natural Easy-Bake Peanut Butter Oatmeal

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I have an active border collie who luvs his dog cookies more than anything in his world. I’ve been feeding him Milkbone cookies at a rate of 3, and sometimes 4, per day. One day, amid the controversy of food labelling, it occurred to me to read the ingredients on the box.

What I uncovered, was a ruse. I unraveled a paragraph of chemical cocktails, fused into the shape of a bone, disguised as dog cookies (one big backhand to the head, sorry little guy).

cookies in jar it copyI needed a recipe that’s easy enough to make once a week, with all the goodness of natural ingredients. I didn’t want any dairy, and I didn’t want store-bought because frankly, I have trust issues, and anything gourmet organic for dogs is priced out of my league.

I’m pretty good in the kitchen and so I came up with this simple recipe. Dog park taste-testing gave it a 5 paws up, it doesn’t get better than this.

This recipe makes enough dough for a large batch of cookies, approximately 30 if you cut them large.

The fancy ingredients are not required, just use your old reliable if it suits you.

What You’ll Need : 2 large baking sheets / 1 extra large mixing bowl / 1 medium mixing bowl / 1 roll parchment paper / 1 good set of hands or food processor

PEANUT BUTTER OATMEAL DOG COOKIES

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Wet Ingredients Dog Cookies

Dry Ingredients

4 cups organic flour

2 cups organic rolled oats

3/4 tsp organic turmeric

1/4 tsp Ceylon cinnamon

1/4 tsp sea salt

Wet Ingredients

1/2 to 1 cup natural peanut butter

1/4 cup virgin coconut oil

2 large eggs

1 Tbsp raw honey

1  cup cold water, sometimes a bit more

In an extra large mixing bowl, combine the dry ingredients.

In a medium mixing bowl beat the eggs, honey, coconut oil, and peanut butter, and add the mixture to the bowl of dry ingredients.

Use either your hands, a pastry blender, a combo of both, or a food processor to get a good consistency.

Add 1 cup of the water, and combine well with your hands or food processor.

If dough isn’t forming add a bit of water, like 1/8th of a cup and knead lightly until it forms a ball.

Set the oven to 350 degrees fahrenheit, and place  bottom rack one up from the bottom, and the other, two rows above it.

Prepare two large cookie sheets with a layer of parchment paper to avoid any sticking. Spread out a three foot long sheet of parchment paper on your countertop to roll out the dough. I reuse this piece repeatedly, as well as the paper on the cookie sheets.

Lay the ball on the centre of your paper and sprinkle with some floor. Use a floured rolling pin, or wine bottle and roll the dough out, moving from centre outwards. You should end up with a large oblong slab that’s about a 1/2 inch thick. If the edges of the slab are breaking apart, fuse them by pushing them in and re-roll the edge.

I use a pizza wheel to cut out the size that I like. Place them tightly on the backing sheets as they don’t rise or spread, and you’ll need the space. They need to bake for approximately 50 minutes. Flip the cookies over over half way through. It’s important to bake them evenly. To compensate for my oven’s ability to burn baked things on the lower rack, I have to rotate the baking sheets every ten minutes. The idea is to bake them long enough to dry them out and achieve that extra hard crunch consistency that’s too hard for human teeth, when dry.

Allow them to cool completely and store in an airtight glass jar. Plastic containers can kill the crunch.

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