Iced Lime Cubes – How To Get Your Vitamin C In Winter Season

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Iced Lime Cubes coverWinter is a long season for some of us, and depending on where you live, finding fresh citrus fruit all winter long, may not come so easily. Taking a good dose of vitamin C can help you fight off colds and flu, and the health benefits don’t stop there.

lime juice measureThe phytonutrients of citrus fruit has properties that are antibiotic, antioxidant, and anti-cancer. Consumed in your regular diet, it can super-charge your immune system, and assist your digestion by removing harmful bacteria, and reducing gut inflammation.

Freezing lime or lemon juice, is an easy way to get your vitamin C. It will keep in the freezer for four months, and I’ll show you how you can do this. Organic lemons and limes don’t keep long on the shelf. And dry indoor heating over a long winter, doesn’t help matters much. They may last longer in the fridge, but they tend to dry out.

limes in bowlI found these limes in the reduced-produce section at my local organic food store. Even though they’re blemished and have started to brown, they still have all of the juice, flavour, and nutrients intact. Limes will get bitter when they start to turn, their peel will shrivel and harden.

Using your preferred method, juice limes and pour into a measuring cup. A dozen limes made six ounces of juice that I use to make two types of Iced Lime Cubes.

One is pure lime juice poured into a tray to make Iced Lime Cubes, that I can quickly thaw for dips, sauces and salsas. And the other, Iced Lime-Water Cubes, a watered down version, made with the remaining 3 ounces of juice, at a ratio of 1:5.

The juice made enough to fill one tray of Iced Lime Cubes, and three trays of Iced Lime-Water Cubes. Once frozen, they store well up to four months in mason jars or plastic bags.

Iced Lime Cubes in Mason JarsI really love the Iced Lime-Water Cubes. They have so many simple and convenient uses.

I toss a cube into my water glass to freshen it up. I add them to rum drinks and vodka cocktails, instead of squeezing fresh lime. They’re fabulous added to tequila caesars, my signature drink. They give a nice lift to wine spritzers, and add an eye-squinting tartness to my apple cider.

And it doesn’t stop there. Iced Lime-Water Cubes make a great facial astringent, gentle skin toner, aftershave, and can help relieve tension headaches. It freshens up your skin, tightens pores, wipes away cubes in jars bacteria, and soothes irritation.

As a facial astringent, place a towel around your neck and slide an Iced Lime-Water Cube over your face in a slow circular motion.

As an aftershave, slide a cube around your shaved skin for a few seconds, to disinfect, sooth, and close up the pores.

To lessen puffiness after sleeping, place a towel around your neck, gently tilt your head back and slide the cube around your face, to hydrate andlime and cranberries tighten skin.

For tension headaches, use the same method, and slide the cube around your forehead. For additional migraine or tension headache relief, drink one or two glasses of water, add one Iced Lime Cube, and one tablespoon of raw honey per glass. Be certain it’s raw honey, which is rich in potassium and magnesium. These minerals help to relax arteries by allowing more blood flow to the brain. Now that can’t be a bad thing!

To reward yourself for the hard work, fill a limes in pot and green pepperspot with cold water and dump in the exhausted limes. I added these cranberries which were leftovers from decorating the kitchen over the holiday, they add a a lovely aroma. Bring the pot to a boil, cover lightly, reduce heat, and simmer for half an hour.

The steam fills your home with the delectable scent of fresh lime oil. The wafting molecules disinfect, cleanse, neutralize, freshen, and add moisture to the air in your home. It’s a good measure to take when  someone has a cold or flu, and you want to minimize the spread of germs and infection.

To enhance the effect, and create your own special brew, add a few drops of essential oils, like lemon, peppermint, or lavender to this cauldron of brewing goodness.

Can you think of other uses for Iced Lime -Water Cubes ? We’d love to read your ideas.

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Dog Cookies Natural Easy-Bake Peanut Butter Oatmeal

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I have an active border collie who luvs his dog cookies more than anything in his world. I’ve been feeding him Milkbone cookies at a rate of 3, and sometimes 4, per day. One day, amid the controversy of food labelling, it occurred to me to read the ingredients on the box.

What I uncovered, was a ruse. I unraveled a paragraph of chemical cocktails, fused into the shape of a bone, disguised as dog cookies (one big backhand to the head, sorry little guy).

cookies in jar it copyI needed a recipe that’s easy enough to make once a week, with all the goodness of natural ingredients. I didn’t want any dairy, and I didn’t want store-bought because frankly, I have trust issues, and anything gourmet organic for dogs is priced out of my league.

I’m pretty good in the kitchen and so I came up with this simple recipe. Dog park taste-testing gave it a 5 paws up, it doesn’t get better than this.

This recipe makes enough dough for a large batch of cookies, approximately 30 if you cut them large.

The fancy ingredients are not required, just use your old reliable if it suits you.

What You’ll Need : 2 large baking sheets / 1 extra large mixing bowl / 1 medium mixing bowl / 1 roll parchment paper / 1 good set of hands or food processor

PEANUT BUTTER OATMEAL DOG COOKIES

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Wet Ingredients Dog Cookies

Dry Ingredients

4 cups organic flour

2 cups organic rolled oats

3/4 tsp organic turmeric

1/4 tsp Ceylon cinnamon

1/4 tsp sea salt

Wet Ingredients

1/2 to 1 cup natural peanut butter

1/4 cup virgin coconut oil

2 large eggs

1 Tbsp raw honey

1  cup cold water, sometimes a bit more

In an extra large mixing bowl, combine the dry ingredients.

In a medium mixing bowl beat the eggs, honey, coconut oil, and peanut butter, and add the mixture to the bowl of dry ingredients.

Use either your hands, a pastry blender, a combo of both, or a food processor to get a good consistency.

Add 1 cup of the water, and combine well with your hands or food processor.

If dough isn’t forming add a bit of water, like 1/8th of a cup and knead lightly until it forms a ball.

Set the oven to 350 degrees fahrenheit, and place  bottom rack one up from the bottom, and the other, two rows above it.

Prepare two large cookie sheets with a layer of parchment paper to avoid any sticking. Spread out a three foot long sheet of parchment paper on your countertop to roll out the dough. I reuse this piece repeatedly, as well as the paper on the cookie sheets.

Lay the ball on the centre of your paper and sprinkle with some floor. Use a floured rolling pin, or wine bottle and roll the dough out, moving from centre outwards. You should end up with a large oblong slab that’s about a 1/2 inch thick. If the edges of the slab are breaking apart, fuse them by pushing them in and re-roll the edge.

I use a pizza wheel to cut out the size that I like. Place them tightly on the backing sheets as they don’t rise or spread, and you’ll need the space. They need to bake for approximately 50 minutes. Flip the cookies over over half way through. It’s important to bake them evenly. To compensate for my oven’s ability to burn baked things on the lower rack, I have to rotate the baking sheets every ten minutes. The idea is to bake them long enough to dry them out and achieve that extra hard crunch consistency that’s too hard for human teeth, when dry.

Allow them to cool completely and store in an airtight glass jar. Plastic containers can kill the crunch.